Archive for June, 2004

 

Combover

Wednesday, June 30th, 2004

Is the art of the combover dieing, due to advances in hair transplant technology and new drugs like Rogaine? One guy thinks so. In fact, he is so concerned that that he made a documentary of the fading art of the combover.

See Combover.

 
 

What’s Your Workout?

Wednesday, June 30th, 2004

The Wall Street Journal is running a feature where they ask ordinary people what their workout is.

What’s Your Workout?

 
 

Howard Stern Should Sue

Wednesday, June 30th, 2004

Eugene Volokh in today’s Wall Street Journal, on yesterday’s Supreme Court ruling stating that banning pornography on the Internet is unconstitutional:

Yet any effectiveness comparison should ask whether the Act is necessary to provide extra shielding, i.e. whether Act-plus-filters would be more effective than filters alone. And the Act probably would provide extra shielding when a 13-year-old, say, visits a friend whose parents didn’t properly install a filter. So the decision is logically unsatisfying; but in practice, even a contrary decision wouldn’t have much helped shield children, as offshore porn would remain available. Only a government-mandated nationwide electronic firewall can prevent that, a solution most Americans wouldn’t endorse. All parents can do is to filter their home computers — and recognize that, whatever the law, determined teens will probably be able to find porn on a prurient buddy’s PC.

Exactly. And with respect to the radio, the best filter is for parents to turn it off. If the government is not allowed to fine domestic Internet pornographers any more, then why should they be fining Howard Stern? If I were Stern, I would sue the FCC immediately for redress of all previously paid fines, citing this court decision, stating that the same logic as applied to the radio would indicate the fines against him were unconstitutional as well.

Read Volokh.

 
 

Bad Blogger

Tuesday, June 29th, 2004

I know I’ve been a bad blogger lately. Been kinda busy with life and things, and this weekend went to see my friends Dave Zweifler and Sarah Parker get married. You can see some pics I took below. They didn’t post in real time because the wedding was in some god forsaken place in New Hampshire and I didn’t have any cell phone signal there. I got home at 2am on Sunday night, only to wake up at 6am on monday and head in to work. So I’m kind of catching up still.

Anyway, if you’re looking for good links and whatnot, you can always check out the Carnival of the Capitalists. Happy surfing. I’ll try to get back to regularly scheduled blogging tomorrow.

 
 

Sarah

Monday, June 28th, 2004


this post enabled by airblogging.com.

 
 

Sarah

Monday, June 28th, 2004


this post enabled by airblogging.com.

 
 

Amelia

Monday, June 28th, 2004


this post enabled by airblogging.com.

 
 

George Bush Nude

Saturday, June 26th, 2004

Well, maybe not quite nude, but close enough.

 
 

Phantom?

Friday, June 25th, 2004

Some guy calling himself the “Phantom of the Router” sent the following to me, as well as a host of other pundits and bloggers:

Kerry is prohibited from being a senator, congressman, vice president and president according to the Constitution.

I don’t recall a 2/3rds vote removing his disability to serve, in accordance with Amendment XIV, Section 3.

***
AMENDMENT XIV, Section 3.
No person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress, or elector of President and Vice President, or hold any office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any State, who, having previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as an officer of the United States, or as a member of any State legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any State, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may by a vote of two-thirds of each House, remove such disability.

***

Kerry was an officer of the United States, and if his actions with VVAW cannot be characterized as “insurrection or rebellion”, his admission of killing civilians including a baby could be, since it was contrary to published orders, if this isn’t enough, then he also admitted giving aid and comfort to the enemy, at Paris, offering to assist them in any way possible to help bring about a swift end to the war, before doing just that with is testimony to congress and demonstrations fronting for a group of liars that many of whom where either not vets or never in Vietnam. You will notice there is no constitutional requirement for the citizen to be convicted of the crimes, and since said crimes were publicly admitted, there is no question as to whether or not they have occurred, even though he was never tried and convicted for his actions.

Unless of course he never took his oath of office.

Ummm, where to begin? This amendment was added to the Constitution as a means of excluding previous Southern politicians, who rebelled in the Civil War, form serving in the congress. It was part of Reconstruction. The North was alarmed when, after the war had concluded, the South started sending the same reps and senators back to Washington. So they changes the Constitution.

While I don’t condone Kerry’s lies about our military during wartime, I tend to think that his words rather pale in comparison to the horrors inflicted in the Civil War, and that the politicians who promoted secession during that time were aiding and abetting an enemy in a manner that it would be difficult for Senator Kerry to replicate, even if he tried. And while I do agree that the Vietnam Vetrans Against The War could be construed as a group promoting insurrection and rebellion, given that they considered at one time assasinating members of congress, Kerry wisely left the group when he saw them going kooky.

No, sorry Phantom, but I don’t think your analysis really holds water. Good try though.

 
 

Food Fight

Friday, June 25th, 2004

Jesus H. Christ, you’ve GOT to be kidding me:

Self-defined progressive Democrat, Vicki Wilson says she worries about race relations and gay rights. Chilean sea bass is another story. Shopping for the fish recently, Ms. Wilson was surprised when her organic grocer told her it was “politically incorrect.”

Her response? To find a shop where “they don’t have an agenda,” says the Bethesda, Md., real-estate agent. “I love sea bass and want to eat it.”

One of the biggest political battlegrounds in America these days isn’t Bush and Kerry — it’s fish and dairy (or at least milk-fed veal). Gourmet edibles are coming under a new barrage of legal and activist attacks, and some diners and chefs are striking back. This week, the California Legislature took up a bill that would ban the production of foie gras on the grounds that it’s cruel to ducks and geese, and New Jersey has a similar measure pending. At least two environmental groups have sued or are in the process of suing salmon farmers. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service added the sturgeon that produce Beluga caviar to its threatened species list in April. Big chefs, from Traci Des Jardins in San Francisco to Nora Pouillon in Washington, D.C., are joining a ban against “crated” veal at their restaurants.

Well, looks like it’s time for Chilean Sea Bass this weekend on Deus ex Culina.

Read the article here.